peroxide cleaners for wool, really? | TruckMount Forums #1 Carpet Cleaning Forums

peroxide cleaners for wool, really?

Rick J

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Can one of you share those videos?
Are the various powder pet odor specific products aka Pet Zone, USR etc. sodium percarbonate, hence safe for such use.?
What about perborate??? i think I've heard of that somewhere as well.

I know years and years ago, maybe longer than that!!! I was doing a heavy pee job on white nylon. Typical in a home.. I used my upholstery brush(horse hair) to help apply the solution. I mixed multiple 5 gallon pails at the truck, and poured and slopped it out in the house.
When packing up to leave, my brush bristles had completely broken down into a bunch of mush!!!:eek:
 

team chile

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I have used trashed green on my own wool rug. Taf, at magicwand, says that this cleaner is safe on wool. As always, pretest first. My cheap rug is a red wool belgian rug. This rug has always bleed. Everytime I was it, I make sure to thoroughly flush it out. I used the trashed green at 2 oz. per gallon and of course it blead. Just flushed it with alot of water and dried it. End result was amazing. the colors were vibrant and there was no odors. I used this on another wool rug(blues and white.) the white really popped and the blues did not fade.
 

SpongoBongo

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Oxidation works best on proteins. Urine can contain protein but the real cleaning problem is urine salt crystals. It is the off gassing from the urine crystals that stink. With enough work, flow, and time water will dissolve urine salt crystals. But acid does it faster and better. Wool in its natural state is slightly acidic and urine salt is alkaline. Dyes can be destabilized by alkalinity and acid helps to reverse that damage. So you can use a vegetal acid such as vinegar or in its stronger form glacial acetic acid or you can use a more stable and longer lasting mineral acid. Urine pretreatments use mineral acid as their main ingredient.

The other consideration is that oxidizers work best on proteins but wool and silk are protein based fibers. All oxidizers are long term bad for wool and silk. In moderation the damage is minimal. But the best advice that I know is that oxidizers should be used only on wool and silk when there is no other remedy and when they are used should be in low concentration. About the only oxidizer I normally use is 3% Peroxide for blood and protein stains. I would rather apply it a few times then over use an oxidizer once. If I had to clean a crime scene Oriental Rug soaked in blood I would likely go to one of the other oxidizers mentioned. But I never got one and doubt I will.
 

fashion79

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This post is old but very interesting.
How to use hydrogen peroxide on white wool carpets?
- Vol?
- percentage of dilution in water?
- Temperature?
- Dwell time?
- Need an acid rinse?
 

Scott W

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According to testing by the Wool Safe organization and others that is more recent than this thread, oxidizers, up to the strength of hydrogen peroxide in the 3 to 5% range does not harm wool fibers. Even under electron scanning microscope, they saw no evidence of damage. Higher concentrations did damage wool. The exact point that damage might start depends upon several factors including the quality of the wool.

Stabilizers help control the pH and extend the useful life of hydrogen peroxide. Surfactants help the H2O2 penetrate and work better. So, a formulated product will perform better than straight H2O2.

You can use the straight drug store 3% H2O2 or get a product like StainZone and dilute with equal amount of distilled water. Pro's Choice Stain Magic for Wool is also in the acceptable range.
 

fashion79

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According to testing by the Wool Safe organization and others that is more recent than this thread, oxidizers, up to the strength of hydrogen peroxide in the 3 to 5% range does not harm wool fibers. Even under electron scanning microscope, they saw no evidence of damage. Higher concentrations did damage wool. The exact point that damage might start depends upon several factors including the quality of the wool.

Stabilizers help control the pH and extend the useful life of hydrogen peroxide. Surfactants help the H2O2 penetrate and work better. So, a formulated product will perform better than straight H2O2.

You can use the straight drug store 3% H2O2 or get a product like StainZone and dilute with equal amount of distilled water. Pro's Choice Stain Magic for Wool is also in the acceptable range.
Thanks Scott.
You mean diluition ratio 50%. For example: 1 gallon distilled water /1 gallon h2o2 3%. It's correct?
 

Scott W

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The exact amount of hydrogen peroxide in StainZone is a trade secret. But, if you mix 50% StainZone and 50% distilled water, it will be under the 5% that is safe to use on wool.

Drug store hydrogen peroxide is already at 3%. No need to dilute that any further. But without the stabilizers it will not stay fresh long. Without the surfactants, it will not penetrate as quickly nor work as well.
 
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fashion79

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The exact amount of hydrogen peroxide in StainZone is a trade secret. But, if you mix 50% StainZone and 50% distilled water, it will be under the 5% that is safe to use on wool.

Drug store hydrogen peroxide is already at 3%. No need to dilute that any further. But without the stabilizers it will not stay fresh long. Without the surfactants, it will not penetrate as quickly nor work as well.
Do you know a similar product sold in EU?
 

Scott W

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Do you have Prochem or Chemspec or Hydramaster or Pro's Choice available to you?

Since I do not work in the EU, I am not familiar with their products unless you happen to have access to USA products.
 
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fashion79

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Do you have Prochem or Chemspec or Hydramaster or Pro's Choice available to you?

Since I do not work in the EU, I am not familiar with their products unless you happen to have access to USA products.
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

Rick J

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@Scott W can USR be ;used the same way, pretty much, as Stain Zone ? If needed.?

Last week, from my local Interlink, I got something similar to your USR, as I already have some of that. But I did not necessarily need the Hydrocide.
 

Tom Forsythe

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I remember seeing a Wool Safe bulletin which qualified the use of 3% H2O2 to remove dye stains that would not come out in normal cleaning. I wish I had the link so that you can see what was exactly stated rather than my memory of it. I would not use without the customers permission. This is a major reason why wool rugs should be treated with a protector with an acid dye resistor (Maxim Advanced for Wool and Maxim SOS). The acid dye resistor fills up dye sites so that stains can be more readily removed at the time of staining and make the staining more likely to be removed by the 3% peroxide treatment.

Most H2O2 spotters (Stain Zone) are at 8% and too strong for wool as formulated. One spotting pro use it at full strength on a wool rug and it chemically burned a hole in the rug. Use of 3% H2O2 treatments require patience as there will usually be several treatments before success is realized.

Our Oxy Buff cotton shampoo uses sodium percarbonate which is neutralized to be at 7 pH when mixed and can be used on cotton fringe if you want it white (not appropriate for all fringes). It does need to be thoroughly rinsed to stop any peroxide activity. I would not use on a wool rug without a restorative need and customer permission.

I am not found of continued maintenance of a wool rug with an H2O2 fortified cleaner like our Encapuclean O2 even though the ready to use strength of the peroxide is below 1%. One time use for a specific purpose is different than cleaning it this way ever month over an extended time period.
 
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Scott W

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Wool Safe now permits the use of any oxidizers up to 3% strength as an additive to cleaning. Rug cleaners I know tell me they have tested slightly more aggressive in the 4 to 5 % range with no issues.

USR (Urine Stain Remover) is going to be to strong to use directly. A few different brands out there at different strengths. IMO, any that are diluted to below 5% strength could be used. Rinse once the desired objective is obtained rather than allowing the H2O2 to continue to dwell.

BTW - for all those interested in rug washing - Doug Heiferman and I will be holding Hands-On Rug Washing in Orlando FL for 3 days beginning May 14th. Join us.
 
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Johnaplcleaning

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Wool Safe now permits the use of any oxidizers up to 3% strength as an additive to cleaning. Rug cleaners I know tell me they have tested slightly more aggressive in the 4 to 5 % range with no issues.

USR (Urine Stain Remover) is going to be to strong to use directly. A few different brands out there at different strengths. IMO, any that are diluted to below 5% strength could be used. Rinse once the desired objective is obtained rather than allowing the H2O2 to continue to dwell.

BTW - for all those interested in rug washing - Doug Heiferman and I will be holding Hands-On Rug Washing in Orlando FL for 3 days beginning May 14th. Join us.
any Arizona events?
 

Scott W

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any Arizona events?
We do hold a number of training events in Arizona, but the hands-on rug washing is only done twice per year. So we move it around the country. Had a great class in San Diego a few months back.

I do not plan on doing classes after 2019. The upcoming event in Orlando is going to be great. It may be my last or I may do one more in the fall.
 

AZHome&Carpet

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@Johnaplcleaning In AZ there’s a Stone Class coming up, I’m going to try attending.
As for Scott’s Rug Class it’s worth a trip out of state if your able. I attended one last year. Excellent class.
 
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Scott W

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any Arizona events?
Upcoming classes in Arizona include the Carpet Cleaning Technician course, Upholstery and Fabric cleaning, stone masonry and tile cleaning, Trauma and crime scene cleaning and several other. We schedule two training events per month in Arizona for most months.
 

jacob collens

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Some really good info in this thread! Wondering if anyone could help me calculate a (relatively) safe way to use sodium percarbonate on a wool mattress topper and sheep skin that has mold issues.

I had a bin of things in the basement and they smelled strongly of mold, no visible residues. Tried vinegar soaks and bleach (separately) on the clothes with no effect.The only thing that has worked so far to remove the odour is a sodium percarbonate soak... I didn't want to ruin these bulky wool items so I took them to the drycleaners, came out a little better but still moldy smelling. Was thinking of doing a percarbonate soak neutralized with vinegar, the lower PH might be easier on the fabric but still have the oxidation action? I do have some PH strips to test with was thinking of bringing it down to 8/9ish

How long does the oxidation action happen for in a percarbonate soak? I've been letting things sit overnight but am assuming that's probably overkill for the wool and putting it at an unnecessary risk exposing it to alkalinity for so long.